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the department of environment. >> budget and finance committee. i'm melanie. thank you for giving us the chance to provide our fy budgets. we run cutting-edge and wide programs. we work collaboratively with the departments and educate the public. excuse me. sf environment is a one shop stop to help to protect the environment locally. we develop much of the environment codes locally for the public >> i think your presentation will be up. so as requested i'll spend a few minutes talking about the housing environment arrest first is zero waste. we conduct the outreach on our proposition of incentives. we have the wait program that includes the implementation of the mandatory recycling ordinance and providing and monitoring cinnamons with the demolition. offer if you wouldn't mind activating the power point i think it's ready to go. along with dp w he set the rates for the various places in the city and spearhead other programs. a related program is around toxic reduction. it offers a variety of the public to expose of their toxic products. we provided information insuring with the least possible
about making urban environments vital. given the present political move, people are open to new ideas. that is true across the country. our burners are being asked to come into centers of various cities for aetna. -- right now. whehowever, as soon as things gt better, they are escorted out. but we might begin to break that cycle. it is just wonderful to walk out on the street and see the world walking by. >> are you giving the twitter deal? >> yes, we are. we just founded a new nonprofit. black rock arts foundation, which is dedicated to spreading interactive, a collaborative art throughout the world. now we have founded but we call the burning and project. -- what we call the burning man project. it eventually leads to the event itself. this is a wonderful opportunity. the thing about burning man, when you look at the variety of people that go there, when you look at this environment, where all the normal boundaries are down in every department of human knowledge and endeavor. if you ask what possible application that we have created that may be useful loud in the desert, -- what wou
past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
not create a giddy environment for consumption, but it bodes well for consumer spending, and apple is in the middle of that. liz: lincoln, what did you see with flows? where was the money in the buying arena? where were they buying? >> well, the money came in, really, in the amp. everywhere with the exception of the commodity sector of thed commodity related stocks, and that's why, you know, i just want to back off for a second and make a point. think of the equity markets around the world today, all negative. the german dax, europe, emerging markets up over 10% for the year, this is a fully centric story, and there's no coincidence this fully u.s. stock story is wholly dependent on whether or not the federal reserve flies around the country and drops helicopter with bundles of money, and the risk related to that is, in fact, michael's wrong, and that the house with deleveraging has not happened that, in fact, the inflation expectations are lower, and we have a deflation their environment, and stocks have not begun to price in that kind of risk-related environment where consumers a
-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures. each was created out of a series of flat
the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that
climate adviser daniel shrag. director of the center for the environment. he said politically the white house is hesitant to say they're having a war on coal. on the other hand, a war on coal is exactly what's needed, infuriating senate mientd leader mitch mcconnell. >> declaring a war on coal is tantamount to declaring a war on jobs. it is tantamount to kicking the ladder out from beneath the feet of many americans struggling in the economy. >> reporter: the president insisted another part of the plan, pouring more taxpayer money into renewable energy technology will grow the economy while protecting the environment. >> today we use more clean energy and natural gas, which is supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs. >> reporter: new regulations could wreak havoc on power plants. >> he needs to take his foot off the neck of energy creators, job creators, allow this sector of the economy to prosper. >> reporter: carbon emissions dropped last year more in the united states than in any other industrialized nation. because of things the obama administration put in place. china and russia t
loose in an environment -- people will always give to a greater gift. it is just a principle. if a group get together to give a gift to an entire city, it is easy to find people who will give to that. and the consequence is, you can learn a lot. talk about a networking opportunity. but nobody ever went there to network. they went out there to give their energy, imagination, their heart to something. >> there is that collaboration, the cross-disciplinary thing that happens out there, but i also feel like there is a bit of a sense of competition. people are trying to outdo each other, try to outdo each other trt impressive thing. >> that is human nature. i read a few years ago somebody complaining, i remember the good old days. you could put up a pink flamingo in front of your tent and it was cool. now with all of these big projects, i feel few tile -- futile. well, they learned the wrong lesson. the interesting thing is, people say that they are connected, but in an environment like that, it is easy to get connected. it is easy to get help. unless you insist on being the leader, you will
. 6772 san bruno avenue. no. 1 to no. 4. richard thomas environment and land management. the appellant is requesting that the abatement appeals board grant jurisdiction. >> good morning. are we taking these items individually or together? individually. in case of 6772, i don't have much to add from the last time this was before you except to state that the commission asked for a detailed table with all the information and i believe we've given that today and it's attachment a. in the back of your staff report and also for your convenience we have included the staff report with the information that we believe you need to make your decision and we strongly urge you on the basis that it's all before you that there is proper information that the appellant is given you to be able to take this case and in doing to mar our ability in both agenda item 1 and 2. and when we go to no. 2, i will be saying the same thing. thank you very much. >> question. could you clarify, are these two separate properties? >> it is and because the applications if you recall you were asking for better clarificati
is on a hunger strike to highlight what he believes our infrastructure projects that are bad for the environment. scientists and geologists say the himalayas of the youngest and most sensitive in the world. the forest cover on these mountains is what hold them stick it up in when you develop a plan, you remove the trees, and they are what the soil together. at least 30 major hydroelectric -- hydroelectric dam projects finish or nearing completion. the impact of them and construction is acknowledged that the state. they accept that blasting d4 station and excavation -- deforestation and excavation disrupt the environment. >> the authorities think the huge floodplains are a wasteland. they decided to diver at the water channels. the land that is then reclaimed is used for building projects. this is a similar disaster waiting to happen. the people who live by the river have seen its disaster. the government does have plans to manage and raise awareness of the environment, but what seems to be lacking is the money and political will. all of thechanges, -- all these people have is their prayer and fa
, biology, physics, listening, cognitive, perception and social behavior and the environment. right here in san francisco. and it just does not happen in every city, but it will happen here. not only in san francisco, but for the families around the world. and the exporatorium does so much more for our san francisco communities. it offers our region's children and families 3,500 under served children and families will have free, science workshops. 70. yes. 70 under served middle high school students, opportunities to participate in college prep courses right here and training and hiring of over 200 of our city's youth, in docet jobs called explainers who will be warmly greeting you in front of the brand new station of the exporatorium of muni. [ applause ] >> so that is the function and the purpose of the exporatorium and let me tell you a little bit about how this place does even more than that. it provides public new access, public access to water-front sites for the first time in over 50 years. two, brand new acres of public accessible open space. access to our historic bulkhead at pi
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud
the environment. people with a sense of aesthetics and of the community and i think that we found such a tenant with chipotle, i thank you for your time. >> (inaudible) we support our families with this business, we are like 52 members that are held together and we support it. and, i am being in this restaurant for 20 years. and why, just in 50 feet we are a mexican restaurant, chilango and (inaudible) and (inaudible) and we are doing good. fairly good, we support our families. chipotle just one more restaurant, for us, it is our life. we depend on that restaurant. and our families, and we have our really (inaudible) food. the problem is we need to start thinking that they can put us out of the business. we cannot support that kind of (inaudible) for a long time. if you allow them to work there. it will loss our jobs, we loss the way that we support our family and how that we support our children, thank you. >> thank you. >> next speaker, please? >> good afternoon. i am in favor of chipotle coming in for a couple of reasons. and express the jobs that will be available or coming to
for dog walking in a wooded environment. >> i enjoy this base and the history behind it. the diversity that exists in such an urban city, the concrete, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football, frisbee, and picnics. it is very m
street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to emerge.
built were eugenic camps. destroying thes environment. what happened? malaria, a disease that was virtually wiped out on planet earth in the early '60s came back roaring. late '70s a million africans die per year due to malaria. host: this is a result of climate change? caller: this is people who talk about the science. host: bring it to climate change. caller: it is the latest fairy tale. there was the china syndrome for nuclear power plant, now we have climate change. look what science says before hand. during the carter -- nistration chernobyl was really bad. 170 people died but not millions like it said was going to happen. host: democrats' line, georgia. caller: i just wanted to say thank you for c-span. i just wanted to make a short comment about a lot of assumptions people are making about climate change. a guy called in earlier and referred to greenland and said it had been called agreement because it was green. this is totally untrue. a lot people try to do more research before they make up their minds with assumptions about climate change before they come to con
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
, off you go. i'll have the environment for $200. laura. what is a plastic bag? yes. environment for $400. sonrisa. what is fishing? right. the environment for $600. sonrisa. what is runoff? correct. environment, $800.
has part of this export ssue. melissa: tht is a great point. obviously, you know, the environment all around the world, we all shre the same error. if we are not on same page with whawe are doing, we are still going to see co2 emissions. how plausible is it that we start exporting coal? we are a nauralresource n al. we start exporting rightway? >> we have two your supply here in america. but let's keep in mind if we turn off coal, we are ceding competitiveness in the global economy. it is disappointing for american business. let's say that. melissa: that's right, you need cheap energy for the manufacturing sector to rebound and consumers touy che goods. but natural gas is providing cheap ener right now. we have seen a boom in natural gas from shale and tracking for the one thing i was thinng is well, it's good for natural gas and natural gas drille and anyone who depends on that. that'sreat for natural gas, isn't it? >> probably about half of that is ol. i really wonder if the president would've beeable to do this. especially if we hadn't really had a natural gas revolution. but i wo
: that is a great point. obviously, you know, the environment all around the world, we all share the same error. if we are not on the same page with what we are doing, we are still going to see co2 emissions. how plausible is it that we start exporting coal? we are a natural resource in coal. we start exporting right away? >> we have two your supply here in america. but let's keep in mind if we turn off coal, we are ceding competitiveness in the global economy. it is disappointing for american business. let's say that. melissa: that's right, you need cheap energy for the manufacturing sector to rebound and consumers to buy cheap goods. but natural gas is providing cheap energy right now. we have seen a boom in natural gas from shale and tracking for the one thing i was thinking is well, it's good for natural gas and natural gas drillers and anyone who depends on that. that's great for natural gas, isn't it? >> probably about half of that is cool. i really wonder if the president would've been able to do this. especially if we hadn't really had a natural gas revolution. but i would say that natu
the environment which we created, the history but because that environment allows police officers to look at my kids like they fit the description of a drug user. and so i fear that interaction with my kids interaction with the police a hell of a lot more than a good interaction from my kid with drugs. because i can teach them about drugs because i know that drug effects are predictable. but his interaction with black boys and police, that's not predictable. >> host: but both could be avoided by avoiding drug use. >> guest: certainly. and my kids might avoid but the point is is that there are kids who won't. and so if they do not avoid it, at least you're keeping them safe by having them have the education, giving them the correct information. not only that, not on teaching them about drugs which are teaching them how to think critically. are teaching them how to evaluate information. that's what we valley. that's what i got as a professor. >> host: you talked about legalization people to think i want to make clear is that yeah, i'm not encouraging legalization. i am for decriminalization. decr
maintained strict control over these weapons. in syria we may be in an environment where we have a different story. we don't know yet. but let's try to project a little bit more and push you into other geographic regions, thinking specifically of returning to pakistan coronary have done some thinking, but also pressing maybe even a little bit further and walk us through what you believe, having examined this particular incident in algeria in some detail, what of the lessons learned that we might be able to apply to those contexts? should we get to a point in either of those countries down the road where we see a breakdown in central authority, are we going to be more likely to see a post-soviet novel or are we more likely is the something more -- something potentially more dangerous? >> i am a former soldier in the infantry. answer is always it depends on the situation in the terrain. these are -- each one of these episodes are highly individual and will depend upon the nature of the precise scenario. i suppose, and looking at the specific circumstances in this episode and algeria and lookin
and developing positive family dynamic, an emotionally supportive environment. further research would improve our understanding of the factors that increase the risk for sexual violence against women and men, including factors that may be shared between the military and the general population. beitional research would important to improve our understanding how military specific factors such as deployment might increase the risk. funding this research should be a priority for congress. they need sexual -- they need coordination to ensure healing and prevent further victimization. the healthcare systems result -- result -- response needs to be better coordinate to help navigate the system and help organize the counseling and resources in a short and the long term. military nurses can receive sexual assault training, but they are not required to be trained in cash at sexual assault nurses. medicalvide compressive care and obtain further evidence accurately and facilitate prosecution. i think our nurses should be certified. survivors may be reluctant to disclose a victimization for a variety of reaso
open space. our small businesses. our environment. we are all concerned about that as well. of course i must say about our housing authority as well. so we are taking on a lot of responsibility and because we are and because we are very busy doing the work we are. sometimes we need your input to steer us in the right direction for what things you think are important. so we are open to that. and we want to hear from you tonight. enough speeches. let's get on with it. may i have a couple words from supervisor avalos and farrell. >> thank you. thank you mayor lee, and yes, i get to make a speech too. i am supervisor john avalos, i represent district 11, just over the hill. i want to thank the mayor and the department staff for being here. and i want to thank supervisor farrell, the chair of the budget committee to be here. he's got a very difficult task. but one that he will have help with colleagues on the budget committee and we will be joined by supervisor cohen as well. i have talked incessantly of needing a budget based on equity, on neighborhoods and their needs. in district 10 and 1
with the experience of the child in mind, to create a warm, safe and nurturing environment. to make sure the substance abuse services are integrated. women's hope offers therapy and psychiatric services and group -- our access to resources of prenatal care ensures regnant women get connected to have a healthy and safe child. in addition the parenting department offers parenting education, one-on-one counseling and support. interventions are and integral part of creating a change in the parent/child relationship. they are able to leave the foster care system and returned to the family of origin where it is a safer, nurturing environment. cutting even four beds at women's hope puts all of the above services at risk; it means losing staff. our children need to be a priority. women's hope program of healthright 360, needs to be a priority. >> moderator: we are relying on technology as a timekeeper helper. next we have district 8 representatives to speak about lgbt youth and -- >> as a director of lyric- based initiatives i have seen firsthand -- i have seen straight identified students who wants par
came all the way from israel to meet the people and hang out and she was amazing. >> the environment, the people, everything. it is like everyone has so much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is definitely a lot more fun than being inside. >> so far we have had zero problems. it is a long-step process, a lot of thinking and people involved. so we think that we got rid of all of the problems that could happen. they are doing it, and we are doing it and everybody is doing the best that they can. >> it is a wonderful out reach >> come. >> it is beautiful. ♪ thank you for coming out today on this beautiful summer san francisco morning. it's a little windy so bear with us. i'm with the s fm t a. i'm so excited to have you here, to have these folks behind me here but most of all to have these vehicles here. as i think about why we are so excited to have these new vehicles hitting the streets of san francisco. the first new vehicles to hit the streets in six or seven years. it's not just that our riders will have a smoother nicer ride on vehicles th
the financial resources to be able to sort of shift this whole marine park surface like environment into one of education. >> reporter: with summer's arrival, thousands will be coming to seaworld, to see tilikum perform in captivity as he has for years. i'm linsey davis. >>> and the festival celebrates excellence in documentary filmmakers, and a range of discussions through the weekend. and "blackfish" opens to select theaters in l.a. and our thanks to linsey davis. >>> and what led police to the patriots hernandez. abc news "nightline," brought to you by the dodge dart. [ stewart ] we've never cooked anything like this before. [ male announcer ] introducing red lobster's seaside mix & match. combine any two from a wide variety of seven exciting choices on one plate! all for just $12.99, but only for a limited time. i'm stewart harrington, and i sea food differently. but only for a limited time. cheryl burke is cha-cha-ing in depend silhouette briefs for charity, to prove that with soft fabric and waistband, the best protection looks, fits, and feels just like underwear. get a free sample an
the environment and signaled by a 50-foot high and 150-foot long green wall that we planted on the side of this parking garage adjacent to us. the museum will be, which was once intraverted will be open f helps us appreciate the sublime and the meaningful moments of our existence. we have been driven by the vision of so many here in san francisco, to make this happen. and we look forward to the next stage of our work together with you. a sincere thank you to neo, and ruth and the board and the members of the planning committee that are here today and the city officials that have brought us altogether to make this possible. thank you from the design and construction planning team. [ applause ] >> the board and the staff leadership and team and the key community leaders and actually have the ground breaking. so i would like to begin with brooks walker and we are going to make our way down to like hollywood down the red carpet, brooks was the ground breaking, 20 years ago and brooks was our chair at that time and led the effort to get us to the third street. >> bob fisher who is our board
in any other environment, number one. number two, we are not a crowd course opinion. there are many places on the web to see what think about joe thinks of a restaurant around the corner. by you don't know if he knows anything about food. our editors tell us why they have a opinion and they are fair, tough and honest. we think of ourselves as a cure rated opinion source. >> but you have great photography. >> right. >> are they good writer in the. >> one thing about the web it is great because you can access so much information. it is unfiltered, unedited and not maybe as well crafted as you would like, poorly written and poorly conceived. we go through multiple drafts and fact checking. everything we accomplish we back very thoroughly. i think there are a lot of great writers out there. marrying a great writer with a great idea is what an editor does beautifully. we have a piece in here by lauren smiley. it is called a girl, her pimp, and her parents. it is a sad and interesting piece about a woman in the fillmore who -- excuse me, a woman in bayview whose parents are accused o
corporate scoef789 and if they go down to texas -- ceos and they will find an environment, whether the governor or comptroller's office, if you have a problem they will say let's work it out and try to help you succeed rather than as in new york you've got an attorney general whose job seems to be routinely high pressure and sue and hammer and sue businesses in new york. it's a completely different environment. it's not to say they don't have regulation in texas. these businesses will say we have to comply, but not an adversarial relationship. >> paul: jerry brown teamed so resent this quite a bit. they had a big flap about that. new york governor ignored it much like he has ignored the economy? >> it's hard to figure out how to respond. perry has a better economic story. his a state is working and their states are not. they have high unemployment and budget problems. mr. cuomo part of his responses is making excuses why taxes can't be cut. that is power of the texas example. without a state income tax look at all the prosperity. >> paul: so it could be a prelude for rick perry run
of time to continue to reduce crime and continue to create a safe environment and environment where we would not necessarily need to have this large investment in the criminal justice system. [ applause ] >> to mr. gas skon. if we were to eliminate money bail in effect turn over a decision whether or not someone is in custody to a judge whether or not they have been violator likely to reoffending or a flight risk, do you think that kind of system would likewise get accused of discrimination against the poor or racial minorities or do you think it would be more fair? >> i think it would be more fair. if you look at the fact that hispanics for instance are under the current system 4 percent more likely to be held on a pretrial setting than whites, 27 percent, we can show there is a disparity there. if we create a model that is based on evidence base risk factors that can be applied to the individual and the setting of that individual and can be done objectively not because an officer is making a decision but putting some kind of value system to those factors that are likely to impact r
to take advantage of this low rate environment, and they are also having to sell into this. so it really is about forced selling at this point in time, all driven by technicals, so we just don't know where this is all going to end. - tony, thanks for that update. - no problem, thank you. change is in the air. president obama will unveil a new enviornmental agenda for climate change today. in a preview of his speech, the president said the plan will target carbon pollution. "i'll lay out my vision for where we need to go: a national plan to reduce carbon pollution, prepare our country for the impacts of climate change, and lead global efforts to fight it." also in the video, the president expressed a desire to grow the clean energy sector. it's expected obama will issue executive actions that will issue new limits on greenhouse gas emissions and update energy efficiency standards. banking stocks took a major hit in trading monday. shares of bank of america and citigroup lost more than 3%, while goldman sachs, wells fargo and jpm lost roughly 2%. financial stocks fell on fears of a slow-do
with the department environment of san francisco. this is actually going to be the highest rated lead which stands for leadership and energy environmental design. it's the lead goal at the top level. let's hear it for our friends from the department of environment. particularly mike palmer they are all here to be with us. another group that was dedicated to make sure the entire project was complete on time is the commission. they gave us time. lee is the commissioner. >> thank you, lee, i know there are several other commissioners in the audience, we have theresa ono. let's give them a big round of [ applause applause. they deserve our acknowledgment. now we have people who have helped with the fund raising and the building capacity for the library. friends of the library, scott. >> thank you, louis. it's a great pleasure to be with friends. this was a community effort where we had donations from $3 to a $100,000. there is a whole bunch of you, c'mon up. because these were the folks raising the money here in your community for this beautiful branch. [ applause ] also we have diane gray who is go
. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most active community. of anyone in this country and any department. he pu
division within my political party. it has not been an easy environment to work in. but i am pleased that in this environment, which was not easy, i have prevailed to ensure that this country has been made stronger and smarter and more fair for the future. thisvery proud of what government has achieved, which will endure for the long term. i'm very proud of the way in which we read -- we achieved health reform. very pleased that we pushed through and put a price on carbon, and historic reform that will serve this nation well, and which required us to have the guts and tenacity to stare down one of the most reckless campaigns in this nation's history. what we have achieved through disability care, to launch on the first of july this year, apparently, an obvious reform to everyone now but something that it took this labor government to get done. i'm very proud of it. i'm very proud, too, of the work we have done in australian schools. today, we have passed legislation, which named 60% of the the -- means 60% of school children are covered by reforms. but it must be concluded, not only
and safe environment that anybody both taxpayer and shared with agree on but we also want to be a rehabilitative environment and that's been the problem with jails 3 and 4. historically it has not been allowed to be that and we cannot get the kind of wraparound management where we introduce programming that one would hope would help toward successful transition back into society. that is what's going on there. the bottom line is we would be the first county in california that is contemplating in jail project, everyplace in jail not just a jill expansion and be reducing our jail space by 30 percent. every other county in california due to realignment especially those reeling from realignment it's we are not and regions in california due to the recent projects, they are looking at expansion. in the last five years if any jails have been built or those in the pipeline to be built it's about expanding their cell and bed space we are talking reducing by 30 percent. with the recent decision by the court that rejected governor brown's appeal to halt prison realignment, an
to describe the environment we are in. in 2009 when my cofounder lost $2,000 on a glass sculpture because they wouldn't accept credit cards. he called me on the smartphone and we decided to change something and build a reader for him to use. it was the easiest ways for all sizes to accept credit cards. it became more than just a way to accept payments and we saw businesses grow and help to grow the economy in their communities. just as technology connected jim and me, this technology has a way to create these communities and san francisco and soma and new york and so ho. we are creating that technology. it's key to our economic growth. right across the street, it connects both cities. it's grown to a small network of cafes all over san francisco including new york. it's important to bring together these business leaders and mayor lee cares deeply about these issues. i would like to introduce mayor lee. it's with his support that san francisco has become a leading example how government and business can work to together to spur economic growth. [ applause ] >> thank you, jack. thank you
they double. >>> fleets are given a jolt. >> let us provide municipalities, to provide the environment for people to understand what sustainability is about. >> 50 electric cars will go in service in san jose, campbell in the south bay, mill valley. the ceo of mitsubishi north america joins. 20,000 pounds of co 2 will be used over the next three years and this could inspire others to plug? >> these are cute. they have a cool factor. i've had young men come up to me when driving mine and ask where they could buy it. >> backers say if 120108% of residents switched to plug in car, they could save a billion dollars in fuel cost. >>> several cars were damaged this week, parked near this road tuesday night. police believe the damage was caused by a pellet or bb gun. there's a $500 reward for information in this case. >>> today the state's fire agency stressed the importance of firework safety. hundreds of fireworks related fires result in millions of dollars of damage every year. if convicted of illegal fireworks, a violator could be fined and sent to jail for one year. >> we always talk abo
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